Black Buck, Community and Capitalism

Black Buck, Community and Capitalism

Black Buck knows it can be easy to forget about the relationships that keep us grounded and appreciative in a capitalist world overly obsessed with ambition. When one of us beats the odds and ‘makes it’, we believe that everyone can do the same. Askaripour reminds us that capitalism does not work to benefit all of us: capitalism requires a hierarchy, and black people always have it twice as hard. Darren Venderis is a 22-year-old working in Starbucks and living with his mother in Bed-Stuy when he meets CEO Reiss Daniels. As Darren’s career progresses, his relationships with those dearest to him hang in the balance.

Finding Myself in a Teenager: Empress & Aniya by Candice Carty-Williams

If Queenie is the black Bridget Jones, then Empress & Aniya is the black Freaky Friday. Friendship and black girl magic permeate these pages, shaped by Candice Carty-Williams’ deep understanding of the nuances that set apart the haves from the have-nots. Having grown up in an area of relative poverty, Empress’ life really struck a chord with me. I got her. I knew what it was like. This truly is a book I wish I had when growing up and learning how to navigate my friendships and my blackness in a world not made for me.

Friendship, Womanhood, and Identity in Nikki May’s WAHALA

Centring around the lives of three mixed-race race women—Ronke, Boo, and Simi—as they navigate their challenging 30s, Nikki May’s debut novel WAHALA considers womanhood and the mixed-race experience. In its tale of these three women, WAHALA is a riveting exploration of friendship, belonging, and identity that will have you drinking from its palm until the very last page.

To love is to see, and to be loved is to be seen: Love in Colour by Bolu Babalola

Love in Colour transports you into a better world. It makes you question your definition of love. It challenges you to be loved loudly and unashamedly. This is clearly a writer who understands romance and it is evident just how much she loves love. Bolu wants readers to know that to love is to see and to be loved is to be seen: it is the action of acceptance, the acceptance of others and the acceptance of self.

Real and riveting, In Every Mirror She’s Black is the perfect read

Imagine the thrilling pacing of gripping genre fiction, the socio-political urgency of literary fiction and the sharp clarity of non-fiction, all thrown together to tell a story that has never been told before: the story of Black women in Sweden. Across class, career, and culture, Kemi, Brittany-Rae, and Muna experience Stockholm in vastly different ways relative to their Blackness but all three are, fundamentally, devastatingly lonely. Solitude is the real story of In Every Mirror She’s Black, a unique distillation of commercial and literary fiction that ultimately hits like a tragedy.

The Go-Between: An upper class immigration story about race and place

After a certain number of years spent authoring, writing about experiences that are not your own simply comes with the territory. In The Go-Between, Veronica Chambers offers a peek into the story of rich Mexican immigrants and how they find out that, moneyed or not, they cannot shed the stain of their origins. The perennially devalued and invisibilised Afro-Latina is particularly well-placed to tell that type of story.